Helena Schrader's Historical Fiction

Dr. Helena P. Schrader is the winner of more than 20 literary accolades. For a complete list of her awards see: http://helenapschrader.com

For readers tired of clich├ęs and cartoons, award-winning novelist Helena P. Schrader offers nuanced insight to historical events and figures based on sound research and an understanding of human nature. Her complex and engaging characters bring history back to life as a means to better understand ourselves.

Tuesday, January 24, 2023

Characters of "Eagles" - Children, Church and -- Communications

Nazi ideology was clear on a woman's place in society: with children, in the church and in the kitchen (in German: Kinder, Kirche and Kueche)
And then the war came and the armed services faced unexpected manpower shortfalls. While Nazi ideology stood in the way of female conscription, women's auxiliary forces were created that accepted volunteers. 
The female protagonist in the German plotline of "Where Eagles Never Flew" is just such a volunteer.

"Never in the history of the world," the Luftwaffe recruiter told the teenage girls from the National Socialist Labor Front, "has an air force been asked to perform a comparable task. The Luftwaffe burns to show the Fuehrer what it can do. But," the teacher-turned-airforce-major stopped dramatically, "but the Luftwaffe needs help. It needs your help."

The astonished looks of the two Labor Girls were highly satisfying to the lecturer. "You will be able to tell your children and grandchildren that you -- no less than your brothers and boyfriends in our bomber crews -- helped to subdue the stubborn British lion. Your Camp Leader has selected you as the girls most suitable for this awesome task. Now, I put the question to you: are you willing to help your Fatherland and your Fuehrer by becoming Luftwaffehelferinnen?"

The recruiter had not yet met teenage girls who could resist his harangue.

From the point of view of the Nazi authorities, Klaudia's suitability for the Luftwaffe women's auxiliary was based primarily on her docility, her apparently sincere desire to be a good National Socialist -- and her name. Her father is a second cousin once removed to the legendary WWI ace Baron Manfred von Richthofen and she carries his famous name. In fact, however, Klaudia doesn't know much about either the Luftwaffe or National Socialism. She has grown up on a large estate in the east, the daughter of the estate owner. She is the only surviving child of grief-stricken parents, and has had a lonely childhood because her parents were to deeply wounded by the loss of her brother to give her the love she needs. The village school is also small and she is set apart by her status as the daughter of the landowner. It is not until she reports for her national labor service that she finds herself on an equal-footing among lots of girls her own age. (Young people in Nazi Germany had to serve one year in the Reichsarbeitsdienst or RAD, a highly militarized organization which also sought to indoctrinate youth in National Socialism.)

Suddenly, Klaudia is not only surrounded by girls her own age, she is surrounded by National Socialist institutions, slogans, songs, uniforms and ideology. The change in society, which had largely passed her rural village by, can no longer be ignored. Klaudia is only too willing to embrace the "new Germany". It offers her acceptance and integration and a bright future. So when the Luftwaffe comes to her RAD unit recruiting women to train in communication trades, Klaudia is eager to sign up.

Nor is she disappointed. Work as a Luftwaffehelferinnen soon enables her to go to France. She and her friend Rosa land with the creme-de-la-creme at No. 1 Stuka Group. She finds herself living in a chateau and courted by the most glamorous of the all pilots -- the CO himself, Major Pashinger. Klaudia's sheltered childhood has not prepared for any of this. In very little time, she has been seduced -- only to discover that Pashinger is a married man and his intentions were dishonorable from the start. 

Fortunately for Klaudia, her friend Rosa is seeking a transfer to another unit to follow her young man, an aircraft mechanic. Klaudia joins her, and together they arrive at JG 23. The atmosphere here is very different -- less glamorous and less political. These aren't Goering's or Hitler's favorites. Some of the pilots are outright contemptuous of the Nazis. Klaudia is much happier, and knows she would find it hard to resist the charm of Christian Baron von Feldburg -- if only he would show any interest in her. 

But Feldburg has eyes only for French girls, and it is his wingman, Ernst Geuke, who has fallen for Klaudia. Ernst isn't exactly dashing, however, and he certainly doesn't come from the kind of background her parents would approve of. Klaudia subtly lets Ernst know she's not interested in his attentions. And then he gets shot down.

"This is the best book on the life of us fighter pilots in the Battle of Britain that I have ever seen.... I couldn't put it down."-- RAF Battle of Britain ace, Wing Commander Bob Doe.

Winner of a Hemingway Award for 20th Century Wartime Fiction, a Maincrest Media Award for Military Fiction and Silver in the Global Book Awards.

Find out more at: https://crossseaspress.com/where-eagles-never-flew

 

 

 

 

Also by Helena P. Schrader

Riding the icy, moonlit sky,

they took the war to Hitler. 

Their chances of survival were less than fifty percent. 

Their average age was 21.

This is the story of just one bomber pilot, his crew and the woman he loved. 

It is intended as a tribute to them all.  

Buy now on amazon

or Barnes and Noble

 

Disfiguring injuries, class prejudice and PTSD are the focus of three heart-wrenching tales set in WWII by award-winning novelist Helena P. Schrader. Find out more at: https://crossseaspress.com/grounded-eagles


 

 

 

 

For more information about all my books visit: https://www.helenapschrader.com




 

 


Tuesday, January 17, 2023

Characters of "Eagles" - The Girl from the Sally Ann Canteen

  One of the main objectives when writing "Where Eagles Never Flew" was to show -- and give credit to -- the various non-flying contributors to British victory. Some of the least dramatic, least heroic and least glamorous were the women who served in the various volunteer organizations that gave out tea, sandwiches and buns to those fighting -- whether they were being evacuated from Dunkirk or preparing for D-Day. When the novel opens, Emily Priestman is just another volunteer at the Salvation Army. 

"I hope you don't mind me asking, but what is a nice girl like you doing in a place like this?" 

"What makes you think I'm a nice girl?" Emily quipped back. Without thinking, she fell into the kind of repartee that was so much a part of her University days. 

He laughed, but retorted without missing a beat: "Innocent until proven guilty -- or some such thing."

Emily has chosen to volunteer at the Salvation Army rather than joining one of the women's auxiliary services because she is fundamentally a pacifist. The daughter of Communist activists, who moved to Portsmouth to raise the level of education (and political awareness) among the working class, she went to Cambridge on a scholarship. While studying medieval history during the mid-thirties, she became active in the Peace Society -- and fell in love with a fellow-student passionately opposed to war, Michael. 

She soon discovers, however, that while she and Michael share politics and values, they don't share the same sexual orientation; Michael isn't interested in women physically. That disappointment is followed by another when she learns that degrees in medieval history don't open many doors. Unable to compete for academic jobs with male graduates, she's returns to Portsmouth to live with her parents and look for other work.

Her parents live by choice in one of the most impoverished parts of a poor city. The terraced houses are dirty, dilapidated and inhabited by people on the down-and-out. As loyal Communists, Emily's parents now support Hitler because he is suddenly an ally of Stalin. They condemn the British government at every turn. In contrast, Emily's pacifism has been undermined by Hitler's aggression. Although she has read John Maynard Keynes' "The Economic Consequences of the Peace" and recognizes that Germany had legitimate grievances against the post-war regime, she cannot accept that this gives Germany the right to invade its neighbors. She sees clearly that Hitler cannot be stopped by diplomatic means; she recognizes that force is the only language he understands. Emily and her parents clash over politics and and a relationship that was always cold becomes frigid.

Eventually Emily finds a job as a clerk with an insurance broker and starts work. Yet she is over-qualified for the job she is doing and her female co-workers are suspicious and jealous of her. She has the "wrong" (educated) accent, she listens to "posh" music, and reads the Times. Emily feels as lonely among them as with her parents. Working weekends at the Salvation Army with the dynamic and self-sufficient Hattie Fitzsimmons becomes the only positive feature of her life.

Then one day a young man in civilian clothes and propped up on a crutch comes to her rescue when she's trying to cope with a flood of sailors come for a hot meal. She mistakes him for a conscientious objector, only to find he's a fighter pilot injured in France.  When he offers to take her up for "flip", she can't resist the temptation. The result is that all too soon she has fallen in love -- with both the pilot and the flying. 

Emily will go on to fly herself in the ATA -- but that is long after the end of "Where Eagles Never Flew."

 "This is the best book on the life of us fighter pilots in the Battle of Britain that I have ever seen.... I couldn't put it down."-- RAF Battle of Britain ace, Wing Commander Bob Doe.

Winner of a Hemingway Award for 20th Century Wartime Fiction, a Maincrest Media Award for Military Fiction and Silver in the Global Book Awards.

Find out more at: https://crossseaspress.com/where-eagles-never-flew

 

 

 

 

Also by Helena P. Schrader

Riding the icy, moonlit sky,

they took the war to Hitler. 

Their chances of survival were less than fifty percent. 

Their average age was 21.

This is the story of just one bomber pilot, his crew and the woman he loved. 

It is intended as a tribute to them all.  

Buy now on amazon

or Barnes and Noble

 

Disfiguring injuries, class prejudice and PTSD are the focus of three heart-wrenching tales set in WWII by award-winning novelist Helena P. Schrader. Find out more at: https://crossseaspress.com/grounded-eagles


 

 

 

 

For more information about all my books visit: https://www.helenapschrader.com




 

 

Tuesday, January 10, 2023

Characters of "Eagles" - Unlikely Luftwaffe Eagle

   Continuing my series on the most important characters in "Where Eagles Never Flew," today I introduce the most important of the German characters. One of the unique features of "Where Eagles Never Flew" is that the novel follows the fate not only of an RAF fighter squadron but also a Luftwaffe fighter wing. The three main German characters are members of this fiction JG 23. Today I introduce Leutnant Ernst Geuke

"Bartels was tall, blond, tanned and fit -- a German officer straight out of a UFA-film. He considered Geuke with a mixture of disbelief and annoyance. Geuke could hear him thinking, "Have we really sunk so low that we have to take officers like this?'"
  
Ernst doesn't look the part of a fighter pilot, at least not Goebbels idea of one. He isn't blond, or tall, or particularly good looking. In fact, he is what one doctor called "a good feeder" -- meaning that not either the Hitler Youth nor the Luftwaffe was able to make him look sleek. He retains a roundness regardless.

It doesn't help that he also comes from a humble background. His father is a plumber in the provincial town of Cottbus, and he has four siblings. He grew up poor surrounded by similar hard-working people who lost loved one and suffered severe deprivation during the First World War, and then lost all their savings in the inflation of 1923. Embittered by the hardship and the apparent indifference of the government to their plight, they enthusiastically embrace the new movement promising to make Germany great again.

 Ernst is thus a Nazi by default more than anything. With his parents, his teachers, his pastors and his classmates all mesmerized by Hitler and his lies, Ernst goes along congenially. His only real passion is flying, and being far too poor to take private flying lessons, his only change of flying is to be accepted into the Luftwaffe. 

Once in, Ernst works hard not fail and earns not only his wings but a commission as well. He's proud of that, but it doesn't give him the money for tailored uniforms (as the aristocratic officers have) and it doesn't change his provincial accent or make him slimmer either. Ernst is an outsider and acutely aware of it when he first reports for duty at JG 23, stationed at a hastily constructed grass airfield near Cherbourg in Normandy.

Acutely aware of his inexperience and imagining inadequacies, Ernst is self-effacing and anxious to "fit in." When things go wrong, he's quick to blame himself. He's not at all prepared to withstand the charm of Christian Baron von Feldburg, who rapidly takes Ernst under his wing -- as his "wingman." He's even less prepared to deal with his feelings for the pretty but shy Luftwaffehilferin Klaudia von Richthofen.

"This is the best book on the life of us fighter pilots in the Battle of Britain that I have ever seen.... I couldn't put it down."-- RAF Battle of Britain ace, Wing Commander Bob Doe.

Winner of a Hemingway Award for 20th Century Wartime Fiction, a Maincrest Media Award for Military Fiction and Silver in the Global Book Awards.

Find out more at: https://crossseaspress.com/where-eagles-never-flew

 

 

 

 

Also by Helena P. Schrader

Riding the icy, moonlit sky,

they took the war to Hitler. 

Their chances of survival were less than fifty percent. 

Their average age was 21.

This is the story of just one bomber pilot, his crew and the woman he loved. 

It is intended as a tribute to them all.  

Buy now on amazon

or Barnes and Noble

 

Disfiguring injuries, class prejudice and PTSD are the focus of three heart-wrenching tales set in WWII by award-winning novelist Helena P. Schrader. Find out more at: https://crossseaspress.com/grounded-eagles


 

 

 

 

For more information about all my books visit: https://www.helenapschrader.com




 

 

Tuesday, January 3, 2023

Characters of "Where Eagles Never Flew" - Reformed Playboy

 All my novels are character-driven and each character contributes materially to the shape and texture of the book. Over the next weeks I plan to introduce the most important characters in "Where Eagles Never Flew." 

Today I introduce the main male protagonist, Robert "Robin" Priestman

 "The others scrambled up the off wing and peered into his Hurricane. There were a lot of admiring whistles and excited comments. Priestman left the others to it and slid to the ground leaning against the trailing edge of the wing. Only once before had he been so conscious of divine protection -- after capsizing a small boat in a Force Five gale in the Solent. Then he'd been a foolish 15-year-old boy, who had over-estimated his abilities and for whom God had no doubt felt pity.  Today, with so many others dead, it was hard to understand why he should have been one of the lucky ones."

 

When the novel opens in May 1940, "Robin" is a Flying Officer in a Hurricane Squadron. The posthumous son of a navy officer, he has grown up in Portsmouth in straightened circumstances; his mother had no income aside from a Royal Navy pension. Fortunately for Robin, his paternal grandfather was willing to finance his education at a lesser-known public school, and his aunt paid his way through Cranwell. Rather than being humble and sober, as such a background might suggest, however, Robin has a track record of dubious escapades.

Most seriously and recently, while serving in the Far East on a torpedo bomber squadron, he challenged a pilot of the Imperial Japanese Navy to an aerobatics duel. While his main intent was to get his hands on the controls of Japan's latest fighter and test fly it, the result was the Japanese pilot killing himself -- and crashing in the RAF Wildebeest. HM's Air Ministry was not amused.

Then again, having proved he was very good at aerobatics and keenly competitive, the RAF thought maybe he would be a good addition to the RAF's aerobatics team. So for much of 1938-1939, he took part in international shows and competitions with the rest of the team. It was a heady time of international travel, dangerous flying, champagne and socialites. 

Speaking of which, Robin never had any trouble attracting women. His bigger problem is shaking them off. Very focused on his career, however, he was always determined not to let any girl get in the way. What that meant was not getting attached or involved with anyone he would have to take "seriously." He was careful to flit from one bright starlet to the next among the upper class girls, to avoid middle glass girls altogether, and have his illicit fun with girls from the lower class.

And then the war came. 

A professional with hundreds of flying hours, Robin is ready -- indeed anxious -- to do his duty. He fully comprehends the issues at stake and is determined to do all he can to stop a Nazi invasion.  In his first encounters with the Luftwaffe, he is shot up -- and shot down. He confronts his mortality, but learns very fast. Within ten days, as the casualties pile up, he becomes a flight commander and acting squadron leader. And then his luck runs out. 

Badly injured, he is taken out of Dunkirk by ship and assigned to Training Command. His job, he is told, is to help other pilots learn the skills that will enable them to survive. 

Robin is neither a good instructor (flying comes too naturally to him to be able to explain it to others) nor is he happy out of the fray with Britain's fate more at risk than ever before. He longs to get back to the front lines. And quite unexpectedly and inconveniently, he meets a woman who threatens all his principles about not getting involved with nice girls. 

 "This is the best book on the life of us fighter pilots in the Battle of Britain that I have ever seen.... I couldn't put it down."-- RAF Battle of Britain ace, Wing Commander Bob Doe.

Winner of a Hemingway Award for 20th Century Wartime Fiction, a Maincrest Media Award for Military Fiction and winner of "Silver" in the Global Book Awards.

Find out more at: https://crossseaspress.com/where-eagles-never-flew

 

 

 

 

Also by Helena P. Schrader

Riding the icy, moonlit sky,

they took the war to Hitler. 

Their chances of survival were less than fifty percent. 

Their average age was 21.

This is the story of just one bomber pilot, his crew and the woman he loved. 

It is intended as a tribute to them all.  

Buy now on amazon

or Barnes and Noble

 

Disfiguring injuries, class prejudice and PTSD are the focus of three heart-wrenching tales set in WWII by award-winning novelist Helena P. Schrader. Find out more at: https://crossseaspress.com/grounded-eagles


 

 

 

 

For more information about all my books visit: https://www.helenapschrader.com




 

 

Tuesday, December 27, 2022

Writing as Praying

 Since the second grade, I have been inspired (not to say compelled) to write novels. I have never been able to explain why, nor how I ‘select’ the topics of my novels. The ideas for novels occur to me spontaneously, sometimes as very vague and ephemeral ideas, which I then refine and redefine at a rational level, sometimes very specifically as in the case of Kit Moran. No matter how much research and work I later put into a novel, the irrational and inexplicable manner in which the initial spark of inspiration occurs has always suggested to me that my novels were genuinely “inspired” not conceived. 

With time, I came to realize that the process of creative writing is my way of communicating with God. Creative writing is not about asking God for something. It is not about me articulating my thoughts and feelings to Him.  Rather, it is about receiving ideas, guidance and understanding. When I sit down to write, I open both my mind and my subconscious to inspiration. As I write, I am almost always surprised and excited by the unexpected reactions of my characters. They then become my teachers, giving me new insight into human nature. Again and again, I have felt a wonderful sense of awe at the end of writing a scene, a chapter or a book, when suddenly I start to understand things that I had not rationally grasped when I started writing.

Because I am an imperfect human being, I do not always understand what I “hear,” nor do I always have the skill to describe and convey to readers the insights I have gained during the process of writing. Nor do I claim that my insights are relevant to everyone. We all have an individual relationship with the Divine, and we must all communicate with Him in our own way.  Nevertheless, I firmly believe that like a good meal or a beautiful building, a divinely inspired work of fiction is something that can comfort, sustain and inspire more than just the creator. For that reason, I share the products of my “prayers” – my books – with others.

 

Riding the icy, moonlit sky,

they took the war to Hitler. 

Their chances of survival were less than fifty percent. 

Their average age was 21.

This is the story of just one bomber pilot, his crew and the woman he loved. 

It is intended as a tribute to them all.  

Buy now on amazon

or Barnes and Noble

 

Disfiguring injuries, class prejudice and PTSD are the focus of three heart-wrenching tales set in WWII by award-winning novelist Helena P. Schrader. Find out more at: https://crossseaspress.com/grounded-eagles


 

  

 

 

 

 

"Where Eagles Never Flew" was the the winner of a Hemingway Award for 20th Century Wartime Fiction and a Maincrest Media Award for Military Fiction. Find out more at: https://crossseaspress.com/where-eagles-never-flew

For more information about all my books visit: https://www.helenapschrader.com




 

 


Tuesday, December 20, 2022

Why I write Part 7 - To Reach a Greater Audience

All the reasons for writing that I have listed up to now apply equally to non-fiction and fiction. The primary reason that I prefer fiction as a medium, however, is that it opens the potential audience to a greater segment of the population.


I'm perfectly aware that I do not write books for the "general public" (whatever that is!). My books are not relevant to everyone and do not interest everyone. I do not expect "everyone" -- not even my closest friends and family -- to take an interest in, for example, Ancient Sparta or 13th century Cyprus. Why should they share these arcane interests simply because they happen to have been born in the same family or have worked with me somewhere in the world? My friends and family like me for the things we share, not necessarily the things I write about.

But there are thousands, even tens of thousands of people around the world who do share my interest in Sparta, the crusader states or aviation in the Second World War. They have studied these topics academically or as a hobby. They read every book they can get their hands on about these topics of interest -- fiction and non-fiction, film or documentary.  Through my writing, I connect with them, and they are my loyal readers and fans. They follow my blog and facebook entries on the historical background of my novels. They recommend other sources and novels. We belong to the same little club.

And then there are readers who aren't particularly interested in the subjects of my novels and would never pick up a non-fiction book about them to learn more, but are interested in  "a good read." These are people who wouldn't read a book "because it's set in 12th century Cyprus," but might read a book "full of lessons we'd be foolish to forget." (Chanticleer Review, The Last Crusader Kingdom) They may not be interested in the Third Crusade, but want to read "the Best Biography of 2017." (Envoy of Jerusalem). Readers who couldn't care less about Emperor Frederick II may yet be intrigued by a hero described by Kirkus Reviews as "like Shakespeare's portrayal of the young prince Hal." (Kirkus, Rebels against Tyranny)

In short, because fiction is about characters (people) as much (if not more) than about historical events, it appeals to a wider audience. I will never forget that when working on my dissertation about the German Resistance to Hitler, I had a conversation with Graefin Yorck, the widow of Peter Graf Yorck von Wartenburg. She confessed to me that "all she ever knew" about the American Civil War she had learned from Gone with the Wind. The same is true for millions of people who accept Shakespeare's Richard III as history or have learned about Thomas Cromwell from Hilary Mantel.

It is my hope that readers will come to share my interest in ancient Sparta, the crusader states and the men who defended democracy in the air during WWII through my books. If not, I hope they will nevertheless enjoy the stories for themselves and want to read more from my pen.

Riding the icy, moonlit sky,

they took the war to Hitler. 

Their chances of survival were less than fifty percent. 

Their average age was 21.

This is the story of just one bomber pilot, his crew and the woman he loved. 

It is intended as a tribute to them all.  

Buy now on amazon

or Barnes and Noble

 

Disfiguring injuries, class prejudice and PTSD are the focus of three heart-wrenching tales set in WWII by award-winning novelist Helena P. Schrader. Find out more at: https://crossseaspress.com/grounded-eagles


 

  

 

 

 

 

"Where Eagles Never Flew" was the the winner of a Hemingway Award for 20th Century Wartime Fiction and a Maincrest Media Award for Military Fiction. Find out more at: https://crossseaspress.com/where-eagles-never-flew

For more information about all my books visit: https://www.helenapschrader.com

 

 

 

Tuesday, December 13, 2022

Why I Write Part 6 - To Critique

 In reflecting on why I write, I have to confess that I use my books to express social criticism of the world as I see it. Indeed, I have often argued that all historical fiction says more (whether consciously or not) about the time in which it was written than the time it allegedly describes.


We can see this clearly in art and film. Here are some examples.




Compare, for example, these two depictions of Richard the Lionheart. 

To the left. an contemporary 12th century manuscript illustration.

To the right a painting by Henry Justice Ford, from the end of the 19th century.



Below two Hollywood versions. 

 
 
To the left, Richard and Eleanor in "The Lion in Winter" (1968) - which depicts Richard as homosexual.

To the right, Richard in Ridley Scott's "Robin Hood," (2010), where he is a bloodthirsty fool. 


 
 
Likewise, although all my novels are firmly grounded in historical fact and describe historical events and characters as authentically as possible, the choice of subject and my interpretation of events and characters is a result of my experience with the modern world. Just as critics of totalitarian systems from the Soviet Union to Nazi Germany often disguised their critique as science fiction, I use my historical novels to render commentary on events, trends, attitudes and behavior I see around me.

One example of this is my treatment of the Greek Orthodox opposition to Lusignan rule on the island of Cyprus at the end of the 12th century. The opposition is entirely understandable and justified, but like so many rebellions (including the one I was witnessing while writing the book in Ethiopia), rebel actions often hurt innocent people -- indeed the most vulnerable and least powerful of people, rending their actions far less heroic than the cause would suggest. The Last Crusader Kingdom is a commentary not only on a 12th century event but also on rebellions, insurgency, and good governance generally.

Another example is my current work on the Berlin Airlift that explores the duplicity, cynicism and brutality of a heartless, totalitarian regime. The behavior of the Russians may echo what is now happening in Ukraine, yet the tactics of fake news, constant lying, denial of facts and science, and fundamental contempt for human decency and fair-play is even more at evidence in the behavior of the American fascist party, the so-called "Republicans."
 
I firmly believe in my motto that we learn about ourselves as human beings by studying the past. When I write about the past I explicitly examine issues and patterns of behavior that I have seen in my own life. Sometimes those are positive experiences that restore my faith in mankind. Sometimes, however, I feel it is important to highlight negative characteristics or behaviors that, unfortunately, keep repeating themselves through the ages. 

I am always delighted when my readers recognize the parallels to modern personalities and events!


 Riding the icy, moonlit sky,

they took the war to Hitler. 

Their chances of survival were less than fifty percent. 

Their average age was 21.

This is the story of just one bomber pilot, his crew and the woman he loved. 

It is intended as a tribute to them all.  

Buy now on amazon

or Barnes and Noble

 

Disfiguring injuries, class prejudice and PTSD are the focus of three heart-wrenching tales set in WWII by award-winning novelist Helena P. Schrader. Find out more at: https://crossseaspress.com/grounded-eagles


 

  

 

 

 

 

"Where Eagles Never Flew" was the the winner of a Hemingway Award for 20th Century Wartime Fiction and a Maincrest Media Award for Military Fiction. Find out more at: https://crossseaspress.com/where-eagles-never-flew

For more information about all my books visit: https://www.helenapschrader.com